Auld Lang Syne – New Year’s Song + Resolutions

“Auld Lang Syne” is traditionally sung at the conclusion of New Year gatherings in Scotland and around the world, especially in English-speaking countries. We all sing Auld Lang Syne at midnight on December 31 but what are the lyrics?

Auld Lang Syne” (Scots pronunciation:[ˈɔːl(d) lɑŋˈsəin]: note “s” rather than “z”) is a Scots poem written by Robert Burns in 1788 and set to the tune of a traditional folk song (Roud # 6294). It is well known in many countries, especially in the English-speaking world, its traditional use being to bid farewell to the old year at the stroke of midnight. By extension, it is also sung at funerals, graduations and as a farewell or ending to other occasions. The international Boy Scout youth movement, in many countries, uses it to close jamborees and other functions.

The song’s Scots title may be translated into standard English as “old long since”, or more idiomatically, “long long ago”,[4] “days gone by” or “old times”. Consequently, “For auld lang syne”, as it appears in the first line of the chorus, might be loosely translated as “for (the sake of) old times”. source | Lyrics

What is a New Year’s resolution?

  1. A promise that you make to yourself to start doing something good or stop doing something bad on the first day of the year: “Have you made any New Year’s resolutions?”
  2. New Year’s resolution is a tradition, most common in the Western Hemisphere but also found in the Eastern Hemisphere, in which a person resolves to change an undesired trait or behavior, to accomplish a personal goal or otherwise improve their life.’s_resolution
  3. A firm decision made on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day to do or refrain from doing something over the course of the coming year.


New Year’s Resolutions Worksheets 

More people to stick to New Year’s resolutions  (2016)  


New Year’s resolutions difficult to keep   (2015)


New Year Discussion + Resolutions + Find someone who ...… /speaking-skills-happy-new-year-lesson-plan


Scots pronunciation

Shid ald akwentans bee firgot,
an nivir brocht‡ ti mynd?
Shid ald akwentans bee firgot,
an ald lang syn*?

Fir ald lang syn, ma jo,
fir ald lang syn,
wil tak a cup o kyndnes yet,
fir ald lang syn.

An sheerly yil bee yur pynt-staup!
an sheerly al bee myn!
An will tak a cup o kyndnes yet,
fir ald lang syn.


We twa hay rin aboot the braes,
an pood the gowans fyn;
Bit weev wandert monae a weery fet,
sin ald lang syn.


We twa hay pedilt in the burn,
fray mornin sun til dyn;
But seas between us bred hay roard
sin ald lang syn.


An thers a han, my trustee feer!
an gees a han o thyn!
And we’ll tak a richt‡ gude-willie-waucht‡,
fir ald lang syn.