Present Perfect Rap w/ @FluencyMC

maxresdefault3

Present Perfect Rap Fluency.PNG

Presenting Perfectly

I’ve never lived abroad or been an immigrant.
You could say my experience has been limited.
But I’ve been teaching groups from across the world map
since long before I opened my yap to try to rap.
I’ve learned it’s a snap to tap imaginations and
highlight words in natural situations.
I’ve worked hard to improve communication
to teach ESL and promote acculturation.
I’ll bet you’ve never heard of a hip hop grammarian before.
I’ve set ESL to 4/4.
If your textbooks bore, when I take the floor,
you’ll speak English more like you’ve been hoping for.
Come and explore the way that’s always worked best.
Have you ever learned well when you’ve felt really stressed,
even when you’ve gotten As and done your best?
Relax. Once you do it you’ll be a fast learner.
Fluid. Like a CD spinning in a burner,
picking up and clinging to the idioms.
One of my students, I’ve seen it happen to him.
He’s been in the States only half a year.
He’s been studying and working as a volunteer.
His English is clear because he’s let it soak in.
It hasn’t mattered that his sentences are sometimes broken,
or people might criticize the way that he’s spoken.
He doesn’t care, he uses English everywhere.
He’s found the key to free his fluency.
Truancy at school? Nope. He’s never been a fool.
He’s been going every day, so his grammar’s okay.
He’s watched lots of movies and he’s listened to music.
A lyric, he hears it, then he knows how to use it.
He won’t ever lose it, and you too can choose it.
Immerse yourself for your linguistic health.

The present perfect. It’s the present tense but
connected directly to your past experience.
It might be something that’s just begun or
something continuing or something done or
something fun or something really bad or
the craziest time you’ve ever had.
Everywhere students get mad because they get confused.
In their native languages it isn’t used.
For a past action continuing now, the present
simple alone should be enough to tell how.
But in English we say, I’ve been here since Monday
not I am here since then.
And if the action has finished, we use the present perfect
if we’re not concerned about when.
So I’ve been to L.A. before not I was there before.
He’s gone home last night isn’t right.
We say, He went home because we know when he did.
The focus is the past not something to last until
the present to help explain who we are.
Like I’ve swum in an ocean or I’ve driven a car.
The irregular verbs get really absurd, so
check StickStuckStuck for the participles;
you’ll know them by heart, little by little.
With have and has we almost always contract,
as in, I’ve done my homework and He’s handed it back.
To emphasize that an action is ongoing,
we use been and -ing to keep things flowing.
She’s been living here for several years.
I’ve been working all night and still I’m up to my ears.
We tend to use for and since to describe unfinished experience.
Ever and never and also before.
for things that aren’t happening to us anymore,
but they’re most important in the here and now.
The present perfect. If you ask me how
to catch on, I’ll say, “Don’t have a cow!”
It’s an odd sort of way to use a verb,
but relax, repeat, remember and you’ll be superb.

Get a free lyrics book of my songs and a free sample of my online English program here: http://fluencymc.com/free-songbook/ Peace and respect, Fluency MC

Fluency MC  fluencymc.com | facebook | twitter | google+

Fluency MC – #YTPlaylist

Advertisements

Your thoughts ...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s